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Here are some tidbits of information that might be helpful for writers

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Acronym Finder

http://www.acronymfinder.com/

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Phrase Finder

http://www.phrases.org.uk/meanings/index.html

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From Junket Studies

http://www.junketstudies.com/

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Business Guide For Writers

http://www.writers-editors.com/Writers/FAQ_Writers/BusinessGuide/businessguide.htm#ProjectFees

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Internet Public Library (IPL)

http://www.ipl.org/

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11 RULES OF WRITING

11 Rules of Writing

1. To join two independent clauses, use a comma followed by a conjunction, a semicolon alone, or a semicolon followed by a sentence modifier.

2. Use commas to bracket nonrestrictive phrases, which are not essential to the sentence's meaning.

3. Do not use commas to bracket phrases that are essential to a sentence's meaning.

4. When beginning a sentence with an introductory phrase or an introductory (dependent) clause, include a comma.

5. To indicate possession, end a singular noun with an apostrophe followed by an "s". Otherwise, the noun's form seems plural.

6. Use proper punctuation to integrate a quotation into a sentence. If the introductory material is an independent clause, add the quotation after a colon. If the introductory material ends in "thinks," "saying," or some other verb indicating expression, use a comma.

7. Make the subject and verb agree with each other, not with a word that comes between them.

8. Be sure that a pronoun, a participial phrase, or an appositive refers clearly to the proper subject.

9. Use parallel construction to make a strong point and create a smooth flow.

10. Use the active voice unless you specifically need to use the passive.

11. Omit unnecessary words.

Created by Junket Studies

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The Phrase Finder

http://www.phrases.org.uk/meanings/index.html

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Some free English grammar and punctuation help may be found at:

http://esl.about.com/blgrammar.htm

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(Source: Writers.com)

Trademarks & What to Do With Them

According to the International Trademark Association
<
http://www.inta.org/>, a "trademark is any word (Poison), name (Giorgio Armani), symbol (a logo), device (the Pillsbury Doughboy), slogan (Got Milk?), package design (Coca-Cola bottle) or combination of these, i.e. a mark that identifies and distinguishes a specific product from others in the market place, i.e. in trade. Even a sound (NBC chimes) or color combination can be a trademark under some
circumstances. The term trademark is often used interchangeably to identify a trademark or service mark. A service mark (Harrods) is similar to a trademark, but it is used in the sale or advertising of services to identify and distinguish the services of one company from those of others. The owner of a trademark must make a considerable
effort to ensure proper use thus assuring continued protection.

In general writing, however, just capitalizing such names is
considered correct. You do not need to include the symbols (r) or TM.

In formal writing and some journalistic styles, a trademark is used as an adjective modifying a noun, never as a noun. Trademarks can be treated as modifiers occasionally, as in: She bought a Minolta camera.

In journalistic or formal use you should not change the mark to the plural form. Instead, make the descriptive noun plural. (Oreo cookies. Not Oreos; DC-10 airplanes, not DC-10s) However, in fiction -- especially in dialogue -- you may. Your tattooed, tough-guy biker character would say, "Mount them Harleys and ride!" not "Mount them Harley-Davidson motorcycles and ride!" (Harley is a trademark as well as Harley-Davidson.) Nor should you make a trademark possessive, unless it is in fiction or acceptable style for a particular publication. (Back to the biker: The Harley's chrome reflected the morning sun.)

If a trademark is in possessive form to begin with, leave it as such. Our biker would drink Jack Daniel's rather than Jack Daniels. He wears Levi's or Levi's jeans, not Levi jeans.

How do you know when it is a trademark or service mark? International Trademark Association catalogs thousands of registered trademarks and service marks at
http://www.inta.org/>. INTA also will provide information via email or by phone.

Here are a few words that are still trademarks, although some mistakenly assume they are generic:

Autoharp
Baggies
Breathalyzer
Day-Glo
Dolby
Frisbee
Hacky Sack
Jacuzzi
Kitty Litter
Plexiglas
Rollerblade
Sheetrock
Skivvies
X-Acto

Here are some words that once were trademarks, but are no longer:

aspirin
escalator
granola
heroin
leatherette
tabloid
thermos
yo-yo
zipper

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